Rower: What Illness Did Don Hume Have at the 1936 Olympics?

Smith Wilson

Rower: What Illness Did Don Hume Have at the 1936 Olympics? blurred-reality.com

blurred-reality.com – Before the final race at the 1936 Olympics, Don Hume (rower) suffered from an illness that almost cost the US team their gold team. The cold in Germany apparently weakened his lungs. 

The Boys in the Boat is about the United States men’s eight at the 1936 Olympics, which included Don Hume, one of the eight rowers. The 2023 biographical sports drama film is inspired by an actual story and is based on Daniel James Brown‘s 2013 nonfiction novel The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics.

The book (and film) mostly follow Joe Rantz, another rower on the team. However, it also highlights other athletes (such as Hume) who helped make the win in Berlin, Germany, possible.

In the movie, it’s revealed that Don Hume suffered from some kind of illness before the final race at the Olympics. Meanwhile, we have found that many people have been interested to know what illness he precisely had. Well, we’ve got you covered.

Previously, we discussed the stories of Dakota Johnson and Brennan Johnson.

Rower Don Hume Competed at the 1936 Olympics Despite the Illness Before the Final Race!

Don Hume, who was part of a rower team that won the gold medal at the 1936 Olympics, suffered from illness right before the final race at the Olympics. His previous experience working in a pulp mill had weakened his lungs, making him more prone to illness.

Apparently, the sulfur fumes got to him, and he became prone to colds and respiratory problems. He had been taking Haliver Oil (cod liver oil and something; this was before antibiotics) throughout the Olympic Trials but stopped after qualifying since he expected it to be warm in Germany.

Instead, the weather turned cold, with occasional rain and wind. It weakened Hume, and he became extremely ill. Despite his bad condition, Hume insisted on competing on that momentous day in Berlin, Germany.

Don Hume suffered the illness because of an unexpected illness in Germany. blurred-reality.comDon Hume suffered the illness because of an unexpected illness in Germany.
Image Source: PBS

He helped the United States win the gold medal in the stroke seat in the men’s eight event at the 1936 Olympics before helping the University of Washington’s senior varsity eights win two national Intercollegiate Rowing Association championships.

As for his death, he died in 2006  at the age of 86. According to reports, he died due to complications from a heart attack and stroke. However, Don Hume’s legacy lives on as a founding member of the University of Washington’s Husky Hall of Fame and a pivotal character in The Boys in the Boat.

Don Hume’s Life Apart From Being a Rower!

After the 1936 Olympics, Don Hume helped the University of Washington’s rowers in winning two national Intercollegiate Rowing Association championships. He then retired from rowing, attended the University of Washington, and eventually served in World War II.

According to Daniel James Brown‘s book, The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics, Hume was drafted into the US Merchant Marine during WWII. He served from 1942 till 1945 before coming home.

Don Hume also served for the nation in WWII. blurred-reality.comDon Hume also served for the nation in WWII.
Image Source: Screen Rant

After World War II, Don Hume worked in the oil and gas drilling industry and temporarily served as President of the West Coast Mining Association for one term. Aside from that, most of his life following the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin, Germany, and World War II remains unknown.