Is You Are What You Eat: A Twin Experiment Bias? Propaganda Explained

Allan Ivanov

Updated on:

Is You Are What You Eat: A Twin Experiment Bias? Propaganda Explained blurred-reality.com

blurred-reality.com – Many viewers have been claiming that You Are What You Eat: A Twin Experiment is biased as they believe the show solely focuses on promoting only a vegan diet, ignoring all other diets. Well, let’s discuss the propaganda in detail.

While there is no denying that a good diet can be life-changing for some, You Are What You Eat: A Twin Experiment on Netflix takes this concept to the next level by showing us just how.

After all, the four-part docuseries follows four pairs of identical twins as they follow completely opposing diets for eight weeks and track their improvement. The individuals were chosen from a bigger trial at Stanford University that included 22 pairs of identical twins. The results are surprising: after only eight weeks, people on the plant-based diet had a higher life expectancy, lower visceral fat, a lower risk of heart disease, and increased s*x drive.

On the other hand, the show has been accused of being biased as many viewers claim that they did not critically look at both diets but just focused on the vegan diet. What about we discuss it in detail?

You Are What You Eat: A Twin Experiment Accused of Being Biased

While most viewers have been enjoying You Are What You Eat: A Twin Experiment, some have been accusing the show of being biased. Many have been claiming that the show only intends to go vegan and does not equally focus on the omnivore diet.

Some viewers claim You Are What You Eat: A Twin Experiment is biased. blurred-reality.comSome viewers claim You Are What You Eat: A Twin Experiment is biased.
Image Source: Netflix

People took no time to express the propaganda on Reddit. One user wrote,

The SHOW was extremely biased and spent the majority of the time talking about how great being vegan is for you and did not critically look at both diets. It didn’t even try to be unbiased before they gave the results.

Another added,

I’m not saying to not go vegan, but thr show was so highly biased and basically saying that animal farming is the biggest and only problem and we only need to stop this to basically save the world. 

Similarly, another Reddit user feels You Are What You Eat: A Twin Experiment is biased as there are many other diets than just vegan and meat diets. The user wrote,

The vegan diet naturally comes off looking better in these conditions. But here’s a thought – wouldn’t it be more insightful to include a wider variety of diets? Like, how about a ketogenic diet with high-quality, unprocessed meats, or even a Mediterranean diet? The way it’s presented now, it feels pretty biased.

However, not everyone agrees. Some have been defending the show claiming the experiment is based on a study conducted by Stanford University experts.

What Do the Contestants Eat In You Are What You Eat: A Twin Experiment?

Christopher Gardner, a well-known nutrition scientist, investigates the complicated relationships between diet, heredity, and health in You Are What You Eat: A Twin Experiment. Over the course of eight weeks, the researchers undertake an intriguing investigation with four pairs of identical twins.

You Are What You Eat: A Twin Experiment is now streaming on Netflix. blurred-reality.comYou Are What You Eat: A Twin Experiment is now streaming on Netflix.
Image Source: Netflix

They had meals provided to them for the first four weeks. The twins must then adhere to their diet for the next four weeks. Surprisingly, one twin will become vegan, while the other will continue to consume meat. It’s a huge departure from what they’re used to.

So there’s an intriguing situation in the experiment. For example, Carolyn and Rosalyn, both meat eaters at the beginning, diverge. Carolyn begins to consume just vegetables, whilst Rosalyn continues to consume both plants and meat. Following the experiment, both twins returned to a varied diet. They did, however, begin to include more plant-based foods and make more deliberate food choices.